Difference between revisions of "Apron dress"

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The dress worn over a tunic by Norse women is often called an apron dress, however it is also known as a suspended dress, hanging dress, pinafore, ''Hängerock'', ''Trägerrock'' (both German), or ''Hängselkjol'' (Swedish).
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The [[dress]] worn over a [[tunic]] by [[Norse]] women is often called an '''apron dress''', however it is also known as a suspended dress, hanging dress, [[pinafore]], ''Hängerock'', ''Trägerrock'' (both [[German]]), or ''Hängselkjol'' ([[Swedish]]).
   
The apron dress is often described as a controversial garment, simply because there are so few textile remains that can be used to reconstruct from, and that there simply does not seem to be one universally-worn dress throughout the Viking-age world.
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The apron dress is often described as a controversial [[garment]], simply because there are so few textile remains that can be used to reconstruct from, and that there simply does not seem to be one universally-worn dress throughout the Viking-age world.
   
Essentially, these reconstructions can be divided in to two general categories -- closed dresses, where the top of the dress is a tube, and wrapped dresses where the dress is essentially a panel that is wrapped around the body. All of these dresses, however, were sewn with narrow, looped straps that where held in place with a pair of brooches.
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Essentially, these reconstructions can be divided in to two general categories -- closed dresses, where the top of the dress is a tube, and wrapped dresses where the dress is essentially a panel that is wrapped around the body. All of these dresses, however, were sewn with narrow, looped straps that were held in place with a pair of [[broach]]es.
   
   
 
== Closed Dresses ==
 
== Closed Dresses ==
The best known of this style of apron dress is the so-called 'Heddeby' style, based around a 10th century woollen rag fragment found acting as caulking of a Viking-age ship in southern Denmark (today, Northern Germany). It is believed to have formed part of a dress that was fitted at the waist and decorated with narrow braid.
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The best known of this style of apron dress is the so-called 'Heddeby' style, based around a [[10th century]] [[wool]]len rag fragment found acting as [[caulking]] of a [[Viking]]-age [[ship]] in southern [[Denmark]] (today, Northern [[Germany]]). It is believed to have formed part of a dress that was fitted at the waist and decorated with narrow [[braid]].
   
 
Other interpretations include a [[peplos]]-like dress with straps, or a dress with a pleated front (seen at the National Museum of Denmark).
 
Other interpretations include a [[peplos]]-like dress with straps, or a dress with a pleated front (seen at the National Museum of Denmark).
   
 
== Wrapped Dresses ==
 
== Wrapped Dresses ==
A wrapped rectangular panel style, open at the side, is believed to have been worn in Swedish Birka, alongside a similar dress where two aprons were interleaved. Another reconstruction from a Yorkshire burial is open between the tortoise brooches, the gap covered with a narrow apron.
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A wrapped rectangular panel style, open at the side, is believed to have been worn in [[Swedish]] [[Birka]], alongside a similar dress where two aprons were interleaved. Another reconstruction from a [[Yorkshire]] [[burial]] is open between the [[tortoise]] broaches, the gap covered with a narrow apron.
   
 
Further Resources:
 
Further Resources:
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* A Viking Pinafore (Description of Hedeby fragment) - http://www.shelaghlewins.com/reenactment/hedeby_apron/hedeby_apron.htm
 
* A Viking Pinafore (Description of Hedeby fragment) - http://www.shelaghlewins.com/reenactment/hedeby_apron/hedeby_apron.htm
 
* National Museet / National Museum of Denmark Photos - http://www.vikingsofbjornstad.gbtllc.com/MuseumCopenhagen.htm
 
* National Museet / National Museum of Denmark Photos - http://www.vikingsofbjornstad.gbtllc.com/MuseumCopenhagen.htm
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[[category:clothing]]

Revision as of 21:03, 2 March 2010

The dress worn over a tunic by Norse women is often called an apron dress, however it is also known as a suspended dress, hanging dress, pinafore, Hängerock, Trägerrock (both German), or Hängselkjol (Swedish).

The apron dress is often described as a controversial garment, simply because there are so few textile remains that can be used to reconstruct from, and that there simply does not seem to be one universally-worn dress throughout the Viking-age world.

Essentially, these reconstructions can be divided in to two general categories -- closed dresses, where the top of the dress is a tube, and wrapped dresses where the dress is essentially a panel that is wrapped around the body. All of these dresses, however, were sewn with narrow, looped straps that were held in place with a pair of broaches.


Closed Dresses

The best known of this style of apron dress is the so-called 'Heddeby' style, based around a 10th century woollen rag fragment found acting as caulking of a Viking-age ship in southern Denmark (today, Northern Germany). It is believed to have formed part of a dress that was fitted at the waist and decorated with narrow braid.

Other interpretations include a peplos-like dress with straps, or a dress with a pleated front (seen at the National Museum of Denmark).

Wrapped Dresses

A wrapped rectangular panel style, open at the side, is believed to have been worn in Swedish Birka, alongside a similar dress where two aprons were interleaved. Another reconstruction from a Yorkshire burial is open between the tortoise broaches, the gap covered with a narrow apron.

Further Resources: