Difference between revisions of "York"

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(A start -- biased because I'm a Yorkshireman)
 
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'''York''' was founded by the [[Roman Empire|Romans]] as a legionary base, around which a city (''Eboracum'') developed.
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'''York''' was founded by the [[Roman Empire|Romans]] as a legionary base in [[England]], around which a [[city]] (''Eboracum'') developed.
   
Later, post [[Roman Empire|Empire]], the remains of the city were sacked by [[Viking]]s but occupation continued. The city became the assigned seat of the second [[Archbishop|Archepiscopal]] [[see]] of England, and, together with the [[palatinate]] of '''Durham''', the major centre of North-East England.
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Later, post [[Roman Empire|Empire]], the remains of the city were sacked by [[Viking]]s but occupation continued. The city became the assigned seat of the second [[Archbishop|Archepiscopal]] [[see]] of England, and, together with the [[palatinate]] of Durham, was the major centre of North-East England.
   
After the [[Norman Conquest|Conquest]], [[William the Conqueror]] ravaged the North of England in revenge for revolts against the [[Normandy|Norman]] regime, but after that York grew slowly but steadily (allowing for the occasional fire) and remained second city of the realm throughout [[period]]
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After the [[Norman Conquest|Conquest]], [[William the Conqueror]] ravaged the North of England in revenge for revolts against the [[Normandy|Norman]] regime, but after that York grew slowly but steadily (allowing for the occasional fire) and remained second city of the [[realm]] throughout [[period]].

Revision as of 11:12, 2 May 2005

York was founded by the Romans as a legionary base in England, around which a city (Eboracum) developed.

Later, post Empire, the remains of the city were sacked by Vikings but occupation continued. The city became the assigned seat of the second Archepiscopal see of England, and, together with the palatinate of Durham, was the major centre of North-East England.

After the Conquest, William the Conqueror ravaged the North of England in revenge for revolts against the Norman regime, but after that York grew slowly but steadily (allowing for the occasional fire) and remained second city of the realm throughout period.