Langort

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Langort or sometimes langenort (translation: Long Point) is a term used to describe a type of low guard or ward in historical swordfighting although it is also used to describe a counter.

It is also used to describe a spear ward.

Arming Sword and Buckler

The term is applied to three wards relating to the 7th Ward found in Royal Armouries MS I.33 although the term itself is not used in the manuscript.

High Langort

The high langort is taken up by standing right foot forward, buckler held out in front facing 45 degrees to the left. The sword is held in the right hand, tucked next to the buckler with the long edge facing up and the blade pointed upwards from horizontal.

This may also be used as a counter against the pflug ward.

Middle Langort

The middle langort is taken up by standing right foot forward, buckler held out in front facing 90 degrees to the right. The sword is held in the right hand, which rests on top of the hand holding the buckler. The long edge faces down (third position) and pointed at the opponent and horizontal to the ground.

This may also be used as a counter against the underarm and left shoulder wards.

Low Langort

The high langort is taken up by standing right foot forward, buckler held out in front facing 45 degrees to right left. The sword is held in the right hand, tucked next to the buckler with the long edge facing down (third position) and pointed at the opponent’s feet.

Longsword

In the Liechtenauer tradition this secondary ward may be taken up with the longsword on the right or the left hand side.

The right langort is taken up by having the left foot forward, both hands on the hilt with the long edge facing forwards. The hilt should be held at the level of, and in front of the right shoulder with the blade and pointing upwards in a similar manner to pflug but held higher.

Spear

There is an analogous ward for the spear from the von Danzig and Ringeck descriptions of the Liechtenauer tradition. There is no left version of the ward.

Ochs with the spear is taken up by holding the spear with the right hand couched under the right arm. The left hand comes across to provide support to the spear in an overhand grip. The body should be side-on with the left leg forward.