Difference between revisions of "Plastic"

From Cunnan
Jump to navigationJump to search
 
m (added wiki)
 
(6 intermediate revisions by 3 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
'''Plastic''' is a catch-all term for many [[modern]] polymers made from petrochemicals, which form a wide variety of textiles and materials. Plastics are generally inexpensive, useful, nonbiodegradable, and almost always unmistakably ''plastic''. As such, they are undesirable for the modern reenactor, but their prevalence in modern life makes them unavoidable.
+
'''Plastic''' is a catch-all term for many [[modern]] polymers made from petrochemicals, which form a wide variety of textiles and materials. Plastics are generally inexpensive, useful, nonbiodegradable, and almost always unmistakably ''plastic''. As such, they are undesirable for the modern [[recreationist]], but their prevalence in modern life makes them almost unavoidable, but increasingly many do without plastic.
   
The earliest plastics were developed in the late 19th-century, and their use became widespread by the mid 20th-century, becoming associated with the "modern lifetsyle". Since the average [[SCAdian]] is typically focussed on escaping that modern lifestyle, they spend a great deal of time and effort is spent disguising plastic. Some examples include:
+
The earliest plastics were developed in the late [[19th century]], and their use became widespread by the mid [[20th century]], becoming associated with the "modern lifestyle". Since the average [[SCAdian]] is typically focused on escaping that modern lifestyle, they spend a great deal of time and effort is spent disguising plastic. This is in itself ironic as they spend so much time and effort disguising plastic in order to bring it to events.
  +
  +
Some examples include:
 
* Sewing leather covers over insulated plastic coffee mugs or water bottles so they look more like leather [[tankard]]s or [[flask]]s.
 
* Sewing leather covers over insulated plastic coffee mugs or water bottles so they look more like leather [[tankard]]s or [[flask]]s.
* Painting or embroidering nylon and polyester [[fabric]]s to look more [[medieval]].
+
* [[Painting]] or embroidering nylon and polyester [[fabric]]s to look more [[medieval]].
* Applying self-adhesive shelf paper (in a "wood" pattern) to a plastic cooler so it looks more like a [[chest]].
+
* Applying self-adhesive shelf paper (in a "[[wood]]" pattern) to a plastic cooler so it looks more like a [[chest]].
* Covering plastic sporting equipment with leather so it looks like [[cuir bolli]].
+
* Covering plastic sporting equipment with [[leather]] so it looks like [[cuir bouilli]].
 
* Painting anything plastic a dull brown so it doesn't look so damned much like plastic.
 
* Painting anything plastic a dull brown so it doesn't look so damned much like plastic.
   
==See Also==
+
''See Also:''
[[Plastic bag]]
+
*[[Plastic bag]]
  +
===External Links===
  +
*[http://plastics.inwiki.org PlasticsWiki] - search for "middle ages" to get information on related [[period]] [[science|scientific]] knowledge.
  +
  +
[[category:materials (modern)]]

Latest revision as of 01:55, 22 June 2007

Plastic is a catch-all term for many modern polymers made from petrochemicals, which form a wide variety of textiles and materials. Plastics are generally inexpensive, useful, nonbiodegradable, and almost always unmistakably plastic. As such, they are undesirable for the modern recreationist, but their prevalence in modern life makes them almost unavoidable, but increasingly many do without plastic.

The earliest plastics were developed in the late 19th century, and their use became widespread by the mid 20th century, becoming associated with the "modern lifestyle". Since the average SCAdian is typically focused on escaping that modern lifestyle, they spend a great deal of time and effort is spent disguising plastic. This is in itself ironic as they spend so much time and effort disguising plastic in order to bring it to events.

Some examples include:

  • Sewing leather covers over insulated plastic coffee mugs or water bottles so they look more like leather tankards or flasks.
  • Painting or embroidering nylon and polyester fabrics to look more medieval.
  • Applying self-adhesive shelf paper (in a "wood" pattern) to a plastic cooler so it looks more like a chest.
  • Covering plastic sporting equipment with leather so it looks like cuir bouilli.
  • Painting anything plastic a dull brown so it doesn't look so damned much like plastic.

See Also:

External Links