Difference between revisions of "Philia"

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'''Philia''' is one of the three "types" of '''love'''; it refers to a foundess for an appreciation of, another. It also includes conepts of loyalty, to one's family and one's communicty, both local and political/professional. The English concept of ''friendship'' may approximate to '''philia'''.
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'''Philia''' is one of the three "types" of '''love'''; it refers to a fondess for, or an appreciation of, another. It also includes concepts of loyalty, to one's family and one's community, both local and political/professional. The English concept of ''friendship'' may approximate to '''philia'''.
   
 
Aristotle argued that the prerequisite for '''philia''' was self-love; he meant this in a philic sense, however, as a reflection of one's pursuit of the noble and virtuous, with friendship with others then becoming necessary as one contemplated worthy actions and shared these in discussion and thought. He also believed that a condition of '''philia''' was reciprocity, even if not to exactly equal extents.
 
Aristotle argued that the prerequisite for '''philia''' was self-love; he meant this in a philic sense, however, as a reflection of one's pursuit of the noble and virtuous, with friendship with others then becoming necessary as one contemplated worthy actions and shared these in discussion and thought. He also believed that a condition of '''philia''' was reciprocity, even if not to exactly equal extents.
   
The other two "types" of love are [[agape]] and [[eros]]
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The other two "types" of love are [[agape]] and [[eros]].
 
[[category:love]]
 
[[category:love]]

Latest revision as of 13:48, 17 October 2008

Philia is one of the three "types" of love; it refers to a fondess for, or an appreciation of, another. It also includes concepts of loyalty, to one's family and one's community, both local and political/professional. The English concept of friendship may approximate to philia.

Aristotle argued that the prerequisite for philia was self-love; he meant this in a philic sense, however, as a reflection of one's pursuit of the noble and virtuous, with friendship with others then becoming necessary as one contemplated worthy actions and shared these in discussion and thought. He also believed that a condition of philia was reciprocity, even if not to exactly equal extents.

The other two "types" of love are agape and eros.