Difference between revisions of "Chevronnel"

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<div style="float:right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em;">[[Image:chevronnel.PNG]]</div>
 
<div style="float:right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em;">[[Image:chevronnel.PNG]]</div>
 
In [[heraldry]], the '''chevronnel''' is an [[ordinary]] in the shape of a thin upside down v. It is a diminutive of the [[chevron]], and commonly appears in threes, interlaced.
 
In [[heraldry]], the '''chevronnel''' is an [[ordinary]] in the shape of a thin upside down v. It is a diminutive of the [[chevron]], and commonly appears in threes, interlaced.
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In SCA heraldry, one cannot have a chevronnel as a single [[charge]]. This is considered the same as a [[chevron]]. They must come in groups.
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In [[period]] heraldry, a plain [[field]] with three chevronnels is seen in [[13th century]] [[French]] heraldry. [[Tudor]] heraldry has a [[pale]] between two chevronnels as a common motif.
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[[Category:Device heraldry]]

Latest revision as of 08:10, 30 September 2006

Chevronnel.PNG

In heraldry, the chevronnel is an ordinary in the shape of a thin upside down v. It is a diminutive of the chevron, and commonly appears in threes, interlaced.

In SCA heraldry, one cannot have a chevronnel as a single charge. This is considered the same as a chevron. They must come in groups.

In period heraldry, a plain field with three chevronnels is seen in 13th century French heraldry. Tudor heraldry has a pale between two chevronnels as a common motif.