Difference between revisions of "Title"

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A '''title''' is a word used before a person's name to indicate [[rank]]. For instance somebody called Michael who is a [[Duke]] is called Duke Michael. For the most part the title and rank have the same name (as with Duke above), however the title for a male [[knight]] is [[Sir]]. In the [[SCA]] knights of either gender are often called Sir.
A '''title''' is a form of address appropriate to a particular person.
 
   
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===Usage===
Examples:
 
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A title or position can appear without the person's name (e.g the ''President'', the ''[[Earl]]''), and may be asssociated with a particular role or area (e.g. the US ''President'', Financial ''Director'', ''Earl'' of Cornwall). Contrast this with an [[honorific]] is something that is attached to the name but is not normally used elsewhere, e.g. Mr, Sir, Mrs, Dr, Master.
* A person without a title is addressed as "my lord" or "my lady"
 
* A [[Lady]] as Lady
 
* A [[Lord]] as Lord
 
* A [[Knight]] is addressed as [[Sir]]
 
* A [[Laurel]], [[Pelican]] or [[Master of arms]] is addressed as [[Master]] or [[Mistress]]
 
* A [[Count]] or [[Countess]] as Your Excellency
 
* A [[Duke]] or [[Duchess]] as Your Grace
 
* A [[Prince]] or [[Princess]] as Your Highness
 
* A [[King]] or [[Queen]] as Your Majesty
 
   
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==See Also==
Note that these are the conventional English versions. Many people prefer titles more appropriate to their [[persona]].
 
   
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* [[Alternate titles]]
Note also that medieval English kings were addressed as "Your Grace". "Your Majesty" is found in letters to King Henry VIII after about the time he broke with the Church of Rome (watch the gradual transition from "your grace" to "your highness" and "your majesty" in the letters addressed to Henry by his wives and daughters at http://englishhistory.net/tudor/letters.html). If you have examples of the use of "Your Majesty" before this time, please cite them here.
 
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* [[honorific]]
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[[category:title]]

Latest revision as of 04:39, 14 September 2006

A title is a word used before a person's name to indicate rank. For instance somebody called Michael who is a Duke is called Duke Michael. For the most part the title and rank have the same name (as with Duke above), however the title for a male knight is Sir. In the SCA knights of either gender are often called Sir.

Usage

A title or position can appear without the person's name (e.g the President, the Earl), and may be asssociated with a particular role or area (e.g. the US President, Financial Director, Earl of Cornwall). Contrast this with an honorific is something that is attached to the name but is not normally used elsewhere, e.g. Mr, Sir, Mrs, Dr, Master.

See Also