Difference between revisions of "Talk:Scholasticism"

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Anton
 
Anton
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I wasn't implying that Dante was a member of the scholastic team, just the giant furry bunny, with horns and a tail. I seem to recall Inferno being quoted at least once in a couple of the scholastic readings I did. Oh, and Kinder (1979) seems to think that the Divine Comedy was the "poetic symbol" of scholaticisim, whatever that means, or whatever weight it carries.
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[[User:Del|Del]]

Revision as of 16:51, 13 November 2003

Anton,

You forgot the neo-scholastic revival of the late 16th C: Started in 1534 by one Inigo Lopez de Loyola (you keeled my father, prepare to die). I'm sure you know the chaps.

Although you have to admit that by that stage the Universities were teaching Humanism, and the scholastics had been beaten.

Del



Oh, and you should add the team mascot and poet laureate: Dante Alighieri (of Divina Commedia fame, as opposed to not-so-Divina Commedia dell'Arte which was definitely one of ours).

Del



Yeah, I probably should note the Scholastic Revival.

I dont think Dante has any Scholastic credentials whatsoever ; just writing about God isnt enough to make you a Scholastic ... it's that you do so by use of formal logic, reason and argument.

Anton



I wasn't implying that Dante was a member of the scholastic team, just the giant furry bunny, with horns and a tail. I seem to recall Inferno being quoted at least once in a couple of the scholastic readings I did. Oh, and Kinder (1979) seems to think that the Divine Comedy was the "poetic symbol" of scholaticisim, whatever that means, or whatever weight it carries.

Del