Difference between revisions of "Sorrel"

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''Rumex acetosa''
 
''Rumex acetosa''
  
Sorrel originated in [[England]] and Europe, grows about 60cm tall. The leaves of this hardy plant, which can grow up to 15cm long, are used for medicinal and cullinary purposes. The leaves are [[red]]-[[green]], and the flowers are [[purple]]ish in colour. The leaves contain binoxalate of potash, thus making them somewhat acidic. It grows in all soil conditions, and is best planted in Spring, and cut back in Summer.
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'''Sorrel''' originated in [[England]] and [[Europe]]. It is a soft-stemmed plant with large, leaves spreading from the centre and grows about 60cm tall. The leaves of this hardy plant, which can grow up to 15cm long, are used for medicinal and cullinary purposes. The leaves are [[red]]-[[green]], and the flowers are [[purple]]ish in colour. Sorrel grows in all soil conditions, and is best planted in Spring, and cut back in Summer.
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The leaves have a somewhat apple-like flavour, but they also contain binoxalate of potash, thus making them somewhat acidic. This is less pronounced in young leaves and it is often recommended that you eat only young leaves for this reason.
  
 
It can be mixed with [[oil]] and [[vinegar]] to create a sauce for your [[meat]]s. Apparently goes well with [[lamb]], [[pork]] and [[goose]].
 
It can be mixed with [[oil]] and [[vinegar]] to create a sauce for your [[meat]]s. Apparently goes well with [[lamb]], [[pork]] and [[goose]].

Revision as of 03:03, 9 July 2003

Rumex acetosa

Sorrel originated in England and Europe. It is a soft-stemmed plant with large, leaves spreading from the centre and grows about 60cm tall. The leaves of this hardy plant, which can grow up to 15cm long, are used for medicinal and cullinary purposes. The leaves are red-green, and the flowers are purpleish in colour. Sorrel grows in all soil conditions, and is best planted in Spring, and cut back in Summer.

The leaves have a somewhat apple-like flavour, but they also contain binoxalate of potash, thus making them somewhat acidic. This is less pronounced in young leaves and it is often recommended that you eat only young leaves for this reason.

It can be mixed with oil and vinegar to create a sauce for your meats. Apparently goes well with lamb, pork and goose.