Difference between revisions of "Science and Technology in the Renaissance"

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Important [[astronomer]]s of the [[Renaissance]] include:
 
Important [[astronomer]]s of the [[Renaissance]] include:
  
 
* [[Copernicus]] (1473 - 1543), the originator of the [[Heliocentric]] view of the universe.  Note that Copernicus' theories were not published until the year of his death, 1543.
 
* [[Copernicus]] (1473 - 1543), the originator of the [[Heliocentric]] view of the universe.  Note that Copernicus' theories were not published until the year of his death, 1543.
 
* [http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tycho_Brahe Tycho Brahe] (1546 - 1601), who built several observatories during his lifetime, and was the first to observe and record a supernova.
 
* [http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tycho_Brahe Tycho Brahe] (1546 - 1601), who built several observatories during his lifetime, and was the first to observe and record a supernova.
* http://en2.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_Galilei Galileo] (1564 - 1642) who further promulgated [[Copernicus]]' theories and pioneered the modern [[scientific method]].
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* [http://en2.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_Galilei Galileo] (1564 - 1642) who further promulgated [[Copernicus]]' theories and pioneered the modern [[scientific method]].
 
* [http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannes_Kepler Johannes Kepler] (1571 - 1630), assistant to [http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tycho_Brahe Tycho Brahe], the true father of modern [[astronomy]] and the last scientific astrologer.
 
* [http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannes_Kepler Johannes Kepler] (1571 - 1630), assistant to [http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tycho_Brahe Tycho Brahe], the true father of modern [[astronomy]] and the last scientific astrologer.
  

Revision as of 11:28, 10 November 2003

Important astronomers of the Renaissance include:

  • Copernicus (1473 - 1543), the originator of the Heliocentric view of the universe. Note that Copernicus' theories were not published until the year of his death, 1543.
  • Tycho Brahe (1546 - 1601), who built several observatories during his lifetime, and was the first to observe and record a supernova.
  • Galileo (1564 - 1642) who further promulgated Copernicus' theories and pioneered the modern scientific method.
  • Johannes Kepler (1571 - 1630), assistant to Tycho Brahe, the true father of modern astronomy and the last scientific astrologer.

Other scientists of the day include:

  • Paracelsus (1493 - 1541), the founder of many of todays modern medicinal and chemical theories.