Difference between revisions of "Safflower"

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Safflower is derived from same orchid as saffron. Where saffron is the stamen of the orchid, safflower is the petals. Sometimes ground safflower will be sold as saffron by unscrupulous or misinformed mechants. It is much inferior in intensity of flavour and colouring properties to saffron, but also cheaper.
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'''Safflower''' is derived from same orchid as [[saffron]]. Where saffron is the stamen of the orchid, safflower is the petals. Sometimes ground safflower will be sold as saffron by unscrupulous or misinformed mechants. It is much inferior in intensity of flavour and colouring properties to saffron, but also cheaper.
   
Safflower can be used as a fabric dye, producing a range of subtle shades from yellow to pink.
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Safflower can be used as a fabric [[dye]], producing a range of subtle shades from [[yellow]] to [[pink]].
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Safflower [[oil]], in modern times, is sometimes used as a replacement to [[linseed oil]] when grinding white pigments because it does not yellow as much as linseed oil over time.
   
 
[[Category:Herbs]] [[Category:UnDefHerb]]
 
[[Category:Herbs]] [[Category:UnDefHerb]]
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[[Category:painting]]

Revision as of 01:53, 29 June 2007

Safflower is derived from same orchid as saffron. Where saffron is the stamen of the orchid, safflower is the petals. Sometimes ground safflower will be sold as saffron by unscrupulous or misinformed mechants. It is much inferior in intensity of flavour and colouring properties to saffron, but also cheaper.

Safflower can be used as a fabric dye, producing a range of subtle shades from yellow to pink.

Safflower oil, in modern times, is sometimes used as a replacement to linseed oil when grinding white pigments because it does not yellow as much as linseed oil over time.