Difference between revisions of "Richard I"

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'''Richard I''' (the Lionhearted, or Cour de Lion in French) is one of the most over-glorified kings in history. He was born in Oxford, [[England]], but was raised in Southern France with his mother [[Eleanor of Aquitaine]]. He and his brothers were constantly making war against their father [[Henry II]], King of England.  
 
'''Richard I''' (the Lionhearted, or Cour de Lion in French) is one of the most over-glorified kings in history. He was born in Oxford, [[England]], but was raised in Southern France with his mother [[Eleanor of Aquitaine]]. He and his brothers were constantly making war against their father [[Henry II]], King of England.  
  
When Henry died, Richard was made king. In just a few short months he ruined the entire financial stability of his father had built up, and bled the English dry for funds for his "holy" crusade. He went off for on [[Crusade]] with [[Frederick Barbarossa]] of the [[Holy Roman Empire]] and [[Philip Augustus]] of [[France]], but not before stopping at [[Sicily]] and [[Cyprus]] to kill a few people on the side. By the time he reached the [[Crusader states]] with Philip, there wasn't much left of them. Frederick Barbarossa wouldn't be joining them for the rest of the crusade because he decided to take a "swim" with his armor on. So, Richard went around sacking cities, killing innocent [[Saracen]]s and [[Jew]]s, you know, the usual. He won an impressive victory at Arsuf, but failed to capture [[Jerusalem]], and decided to go home (Philip had already turned-tail and fled back to France).
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When Henry died, Richard was made king. In just a few short months he ruined the entire financial stability of his father had built up, and bled the English dry for funds for his "holy" crusade. He went off for on [[Crusade]] with [[Frederick Barbarossa]] of the [[Holy Roman Empire]] and [[Philip Augustus]] of [[France]], but not before stopping at [[Sicily]] and [[Cyprus]] to kill a few people on the side, and effectively pissing off every monarch in Europe. By the time he reached the [[Crusader states]] with Philip, there wasn't much left of them. Frederick Barbarossa wouldn't be joining them for the rest of the crusade because he decided to take a "swim" with his armor on. So, Richard went around sacking cities, killing innocent [[Saracen]]s and [[Jew]]s, you know, the usual. He won an impressive victory at Arsuf, but failed to capture [[Jerusalem]], and decided to go home (Philip had already turned-tail and fled back to France).
  
 
On his way back to England he was captured by [[Duke Leopold]] of [[Austria]], who turned him over to the new Holy Roman Emperor, [[Henry VI]], who held him for a king's [[ransom]]. Richard finally went free after a huge ransom of 100,000 pounds was paid, bankrupting England (again). He spent his remaining years alive building unnecessarily huge [[castle]]s and making pointless war against [[France]]. One day while attacking a castle in an attempt to take it's newly discovered buried treasure, he was killed by a [[peasant]] with a [[crossbow]]. Thus ends the "glorious" [[reign]] of King Richard I.
 
On his way back to England he was captured by [[Duke Leopold]] of [[Austria]], who turned him over to the new Holy Roman Emperor, [[Henry VI]], who held him for a king's [[ransom]]. Richard finally went free after a huge ransom of 100,000 pounds was paid, bankrupting England (again). He spent his remaining years alive building unnecessarily huge [[castle]]s and making pointless war against [[France]]. One day while attacking a castle in an attempt to take it's newly discovered buried treasure, he was killed by a [[peasant]] with a [[crossbow]]. Thus ends the "glorious" [[reign]] of King Richard I.

Revision as of 00:58, 29 September 2004

Richard I (the Lionhearted, or Cour de Lion in French) is one of the most over-glorified kings in history. He was born in Oxford, England, but was raised in Southern France with his mother Eleanor of Aquitaine. He and his brothers were constantly making war against their father Henry II, King of England.

When Henry died, Richard was made king. In just a few short months he ruined the entire financial stability of his father had built up, and bled the English dry for funds for his "holy" crusade. He went off for on Crusade with Frederick Barbarossa of the Holy Roman Empire and Philip Augustus of France, but not before stopping at Sicily and Cyprus to kill a few people on the side, and effectively pissing off every monarch in Europe. By the time he reached the Crusader states with Philip, there wasn't much left of them. Frederick Barbarossa wouldn't be joining them for the rest of the crusade because he decided to take a "swim" with his armor on. So, Richard went around sacking cities, killing innocent Saracens and Jews, you know, the usual. He won an impressive victory at Arsuf, but failed to capture Jerusalem, and decided to go home (Philip had already turned-tail and fled back to France).

On his way back to England he was captured by Duke Leopold of Austria, who turned him over to the new Holy Roman Emperor, Henry VI, who held him for a king's ransom. Richard finally went free after a huge ransom of 100,000 pounds was paid, bankrupting England (again). He spent his remaining years alive building unnecessarily huge castles and making pointless war against France. One day while attacking a castle in an attempt to take it's newly discovered buried treasure, he was killed by a peasant with a crossbow. Thus ends the "glorious" reign of King Richard I.

Richard is remembered as one of the greatest kings in medieval history, but in reality he was an awful ruler and a cruel person. Really, the only thing he was good at was war. In his short 10 year reign he destroyed everything his magnificent father Henry II did to stabilize his kingdom and make England a superpower.

Preceded by:
Henry II

English Monarchs

Succeeded by:
John Lackland