Difference between revisions of "Redacting"

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(note on alternative terms in current use)
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Written [[recipes]] in [[period]] are not the same as modern recipes. They were composed with a certain level of prior knowledge assumed by the author. Most recipes consist of a listing of ingredients and [[cooking]] methods with very little in the way of specific quantities. Although one frequently finds proportions. Other directions that tend to be lacking are times and temperatures for cooking with the directions "cook it until it be enough" being very common.
 
Written [[recipes]] in [[period]] are not the same as modern recipes. They were composed with a certain level of prior knowledge assumed by the author. Most recipes consist of a listing of ingredients and [[cooking]] methods with very little in the way of specific quantities. Although one frequently finds proportions. Other directions that tend to be lacking are times and temperatures for cooking with the directions "cook it until it be enough" being very common.
   
[[SCA]] cooks find themselves in the position of reading period recipes and translating them into the modern recipe format with the appropriate measures, times and techniques. This process has come to be known as '''redacting'''. Below you will find an example.
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[[SCA]] cooks find themselves in the position of reading period recipes and translating them into the modern recipe format with the appropriate measures, times and techniques. This process has come to be known as '''redacting''', though this term is not universally accepted by SCA cooks (other terms include "working up (a recipe)" and "interpreting"). Below you will find an example.
   
 
== Example ==
 
== Example ==

Revision as of 22:47, 22 February 2006