Difference between revisions of "Recorder"

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[[image:medievalrecorder.jpg|right|200px|thumb|Replica recorder.]]
The '''recorder''' is a woodwind [[music|musical]] instrument in the flute family. Though flute-like whistle instruments date from the Iron Age, it is unknown when the recorder was invented. The earliest surviving examples date to the latter [[17th century]]. The vast majority of recorders made today resemble the more refined Baroque variety. Notwithstanding the documentery ignorance concerning its precise [[medieval]] shape and mode of use, the recorder has become ingrained in the [[recreationist]] [[canon]] as an [[authenticity|authentic]] [[period]] instrument.
 
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The '''recorder''' is a woodwind [[musical instrument]] in the flute family. Though flute-like whistle instruments date from the Iron Age, it is unknown when the recorder was invented. The earliest depiction of a recorder, by scholarly consensus, is from a [[12th century]] Psalter in the library of Glasgow University. The word record first appears in the [[14th century]] and a recorder tutor, ''Opera Intitulata Fontegara'', was printed in [[Venice]] in 1535. The earliest surviving examples date to the latter [[17th century]] but partial examples are known from the [[14th century]] onwards.
[[category:musical instruments]]
 
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=External Link=
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* [http://www.recorderhomepage.net/medieval.html Medieval Recorders]
 
[[category:musical instruments]] [[category:artefact (medieval)]]

Latest revision as of 21:38, 22 February 2007

Replica recorder.

The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument in the flute family. Though flute-like whistle instruments date from the Iron Age, it is unknown when the recorder was invented. The earliest depiction of a recorder, by scholarly consensus, is from a 12th century Psalter in the library of Glasgow University. The word record first appears in the 14th century and a recorder tutor, Opera Intitulata Fontegara, was printed in Venice in 1535. The earliest surviving examples date to the latter 17th century but partial examples are known from the 14th century onwards.

External Link