Difference between revisions of "Rapier"

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(SCA rapier)
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A '''rapier''' is a slender, sharply pointed, two-edged [[sword]] with a blade at least 90 [[centimetre]]s in length, often sporting an elaborate [[hilt]] and hand-guard.
 
A '''rapier''' is a slender, sharply pointed, two-edged [[sword]] with a blade at least 90 [[centimetre]]s in length, often sporting an elaborate [[hilt]] and hand-guard.
  
The rapier developed at the very end of the [[16th century]] as a modification of what is now known as the "cut-and-thrust" style [[sword]].  It was slimmer and nimbler than the thrusting [[broad-sword]], a feature that enabled it to grow longer, and increased the usefulness of thrusting attacks thanks to its reach.
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The rapier developed at the very end of the [[16th century]] as a modification of what is now known as the "cut-and-thrust" style [[sword]].  It was slimmer and nimbler than the thrusting [[broadsword]], a feature that enabled it to grow longer, and increased the usefulness of thrusting attacks thanks to its reach.
  
specialty polearms-- such as the later versions of [[halberd]].  
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speciality [[polearm]]s-- such as the later versions of [[halberd]].  
  
 
As [[steel-plate]] [[armour]] became obsolete or shrunk in size due to the increasing use of [[firearm]]s in the late 16th century and the beginning of the [[17th century]], the rapier, in various modified forms, gained usefulness on the battlefield.
 
As [[steel-plate]] [[armour]] became obsolete or shrunk in size due to the increasing use of [[firearm]]s in the late 16th century and the beginning of the [[17th century]], the rapier, in various modified forms, gained usefulness on the battlefield.
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The rapier is capable of both slashing and thrusting attacks, but the style of fighting popular during its advent and heyday favoured the thrusting attacks we popularly associate with "[[fencing]]".
 
The rapier is capable of both slashing and thrusting attacks, but the style of fighting popular during its advent and heyday favoured the thrusting attacks we popularly associate with "[[fencing]]".
  
The rapier's slimmer cousin, the [[foil]], is the sword most often associated with the [[duel]]s of [[honour]] depicted in [[literature]] and movies, such as ''[[The Three Musketeers]]''.
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The rapier's slimmer cousin, the [[Fencing Foil|foil]], is the sword most often associated with the [[duel]]s of [[honour]] depicted in [[literature]] and movies, such as ''[[The Three Musketeers]]''.
  
 
For a more detailed explanation of the primary use of the rapier-- Dueling-- see [[European dueling sword]].
 
For a more detailed explanation of the primary use of the rapier-- Dueling-- see [[European dueling sword]].
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For a thorough and somewhat technical discusion of the rapier see:
 
For a thorough and somewhat technical discusion of the rapier see:
 
* Characteristics of the Rapier by Chris Evans - http://swordforum.com/articles/antiques/char-rapier.php
 
* Characteristics of the Rapier by Chris Evans - http://swordforum.com/articles/antiques/char-rapier.php
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===SCA rapiers===
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In the [[SCA]], the term 'rapier' is commonly used instead of '[[fencing]]'. In [[Lochac]], 'rapier' also refers to the in-house [[fibreglass rapier|fibreglass]] blades.

Revision as of 16:59, 18 June 2004