Difference between revisions of "Ptolemy"

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(Major extension explaining Ptolemy's cosmological model)
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'''Ptolemy''' was a [[greek]] [[astronomy|astronomer]]. His view of the solar system remained the popular view for more than a thousand years.
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Throughout almost all of our period of interest the accepted description of the universe was that of Claudius Ptolemaeus ('''Ptolemy'''
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The Earth was spherical - partly because the sphere was the most perfect of all forms, and partly through logical reasoning. When you see a ship coming into the shore, you first see the mast, then the sails, and finally the hull. Aristotle reasoned that this could only be explained logically if the surface of the sea was curved. He also backed this up with observations of the moon and stars showing, for instance, that the pole star is higher in the sky the further north you travel, an observation that also supported the idea that people were travelling on the surface of a sphere.
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Beyond the Earth was the moon, and the orbit of the moon divided the universe into the sub-lunar and trans-lunar spheres. The sub-lunar sphere, that below the orbit of the moon, was the realm of man, all living creatures and the laws of physics. The orbit of the moon marked the edge of that region in which man could live and breathe.
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Beyond the planets were the fixed stars, attached to the firmament, the perfect sphere that contained the entire universe. This marked the boundary of the far side of the firmament was heaven itself.
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This world view had lasted for over a thousand years.
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'''See also:'''
 
'''See also:'''
 
* [[Astronomy]]
 
* [[Astronomy]]

Revision as of 21:00, 5 February 2005