Difference between revisions of "Prester John"

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'''Prester John''' (also '''Presbyter John''') was a legendary [[Christian]] ruler in [[India]], combining the roles of patriarch and [[king]]. The legend of Prester John began in [[12th century]] with two reports of visits of an [[archbishop]] of India to [[Constantinople]] and of a Patriarch of India to [[Rome]] at the time of Pope [[Calixtus II]] (1119-1124). These visits cannot be confirmed, evidence of both being second-hand reports.
Taken, wholesale, from [[Wikipaedia]], this is intended to be a starting-point around which further material can be hung. No '''internal links''' have yet been added, as the Wikis have different indices. --[[User:Simoncursitor|Simoncursitor]] 17:15, 20 Oct 2004 (EST)
 
 
I have "fattened" this with further detail, but have not internally linked it to any great extent (a couple of countries, and a king (who turns out not to be as yet articled in any case) --[[User:Simoncursitor|Simoncursitor]] 19:53, 20 Oct 2004 (EST)
 
 
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'''Prester John''' (also '''Presbyter John''') was a legendary Christian ruler in India, combining the roles of patriarch and king. The legend of Prester John began in 12th century with two reports of visits of an archbishop of India to Constantinople and of a Patriarch of India to Rome at the time of Pope Calixtus II (1119-1124). These visits cannot be confirmed, evidence of both being second hand reports.
 
   
 
Otto of Freisingen in his Chronicon of 1145 reports that in 1144, he had met, in the presence of pope Eugene II in Viterbo, a certain Hugo, bishop of Gabala, who told him that Prester John was a Nestorian Christian, was descended from one of the Three Magi, and had defeated the Mohammedans in a great battle "not many years ago". After this battle, Prester John allegedly set out for Jerusalem to rescue the Holy Land, but the swollen waters of the Tigris compelled him to return to his own country. He was said to be enormously wealthy, his sceptre, for example, being of pure emeralds.
 
Otto of Freisingen in his Chronicon of 1145 reports that in 1144, he had met, in the presence of pope Eugene II in Viterbo, a certain Hugo, bishop of Gabala, who told him that Prester John was a Nestorian Christian, was descended from one of the Three Magi, and had defeated the Mohammedans in a great battle "not many years ago". After this battle, Prester John allegedly set out for Jerusalem to rescue the Holy Land, but the swollen waters of the Tigris compelled him to return to his own country. He was said to be enormously wealthy, his sceptre, for example, being of pure emeralds.
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Cartographers located the land of Prester John, variously, in Tibet (c.1507), in Africa (''Carta Marina'' 1516) and then specifically in Abyssinia. Leutholf (1681) finally dismissed this as erroneous, but by then the legend had stimulated exploration and missionary activity throughout NE Africa, central Asia and [[China]].
 
Cartographers located the land of Prester John, variously, in Tibet (c.1507), in Africa (''Carta Marina'' 1516) and then specifically in Abyssinia. Leutholf (1681) finally dismissed this as erroneous, but by then the legend had stimulated exploration and missionary activity throughout NE Africa, central Asia and [[China]].
   
"Sir John Mandeville", writing c.1366, offers an extended and fanciful account of Prester John (although he never states he has visited the country in question). Thus he says that the rocks of the sea-bed drew iron to them, disabling any iron-nailed ship which approached. Prester John's land held 72 proivinces, each ruled by a king. Seven kings served him directly at a time, on a rota basis, together with 72 dukes and 360 earls. His capital was at Susa; his throne there stood upon seven tiers, each of a precious stone: onyx, crystal, jasper green, amethyst, sardine (''possibly sardonyx''), carnelian and chrysolite. He also had a plaace at Nysa. He had 3 archbishops and 20 bishops at his court every day, and his equivalent of the pope was the patriarch of St.Thomas [Which would have been consonant with the legend that St.Thomas had journeyed to India and died there. [[Alfred the Great]], in 833, sent 2 priests with gifts to St.Thomas' shrine].
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"Sir John Mandeville", writing c.1366, offers an extended and fanciful account of Prester John (although he never states he has visited the country in question). Thus he says that the rocks of the sea-bed drew iron to them, disabling any iron-nailed ship which approached. Prester John's land held 72 proivinces, each ruled by a king. Seven kings served him directly at a time, on a rota basis, together with 72 dukes and 360 earls. His capital was at Susa; his throne there stood upon seven tiers, each of a precious stone: onyx, crystal, jasper green, amethyst, sardine (''possibly sardonyx''), carnelian and chrysolite. He also had a palace at Nysa. He had 3 archbishops and 20 bishops at his court every day, and his equivalent of the pope was the patriarch of St.Thomas. (Which would have been consonant with the legend that St.Thomas had journeyed to India and died there. [[Alfred the Great]], in 833, sent 2 priests with gifts to St.Thomas' shrine.)
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''This article was initially extracted from [[Wikipedia]].''

Revision as of 09:30, 21 October 2004