Difference between revisions of "Poetic meter"

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(Gave a brief overview. Wording may need to be massaged.)
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Early Anglo-Saxon poetry relied not so much on syllable count, but on the number of stressed syllables per line. Middle English poets such as [[Geoffrey Chaucer]] moved towards strict syllable count, and the bulk of his [[Canterbury Tales]] was written with ten syllables per line. Later forms of poetry began to use classical methods of writing poetry, and [[metric feet]] became the most important aspect of meter.
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Because of the nature of the [[English]] language, metric feet were interpreted slightly differently to the way they were in [[Latin]] or [[French]] poetry. In English the most significant variation in speech is emphasis, so metric feet were based on which syllables were stressed. In French poetry syllable length was more significant, and so metric feet are based on where the longer syllables lie. [[Thomas Campion]] in his ''Art of English Poesie'' attempted to reform English poetry so that it relied on syllable length, but the variation in English syllable lengths is so small that he was ultimately unsuccessful in spite of the obvious benefits to musical lyrics.
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Another feature often used in poetry is the caesura, which is just a pause in the middle of a line.
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=== A Renaissance Perspective ===
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This is from [[George Gascoigne]]'s Certayne Notes of Instruction .... which is here
 
This is from [[George Gascoigne]]'s Certayne Notes of Instruction .... which is here
 
http://leehrsn.stormloader.com/gg/cnoi.html
 
http://leehrsn.stormloader.com/gg/cnoi.html

Revision as of 10:50, 12 November 2003