Difference between revisions of "Peacock"

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It is best known for its [[feather]]s being brightly coloured, in [[emerald]], [[purple]] and [[sapphire]] [[blue]], and for a tail of enlongated feathers, with an "eye" pattern toward the tip, which the bird can spread out, as a courting display, and as a threat display to foes. These feathers are popular for the decoration of [[clothing|garb]]. For this reason peacocks tend to be aggressive in defending themselves.
 
It is best known for its [[feather]]s being brightly coloured, in [[emerald]], [[purple]] and [[sapphire]] [[blue]], and for a tail of enlongated feathers, with an "eye" pattern toward the tip, which the bird can spread out, as a courting display, and as a threat display to foes. These feathers are popular for the decoration of [[clothing|garb]]. For this reason peacocks tend to be aggressive in defending themselves.
   
In the [[Middle Ages]], the peacock [[22th Century symbolism|symbolised]] pride and vanity.
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In the [[Middle Ages]], the peacock [[12th Century symbolism|symbolised]] pride and vanity.

Revision as of 11:15, 20 April 2006

A peacock is a goose-sized bird, with an upright stance and a long thin neck. Its call is a horrible screeching frequently mistaken for a baby being strangled!

It is best known for its feathers being brightly coloured, in emerald, purple and sapphire blue, and for a tail of enlongated feathers, with an "eye" pattern toward the tip, which the bird can spread out, as a courting display, and as a threat display to foes. These feathers are popular for the decoration of garb. For this reason peacocks tend to be aggressive in defending themselves.

In the Middle Ages, the peacock symbolised pride and vanity.