Difference between revisions of "Pair of plates"

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A '''pair of plates''' (modern: ''coat of plates'') is a term used to describe the type of [[armour]] that consisted of [[metal]] (typically [[iron]]) [[plate]]s rivetted to the inside of a [[fabric]] or [[leather]] covering. Sometimes the [[plate]]s might be found onthe outside of the [[armour]]. The covering typically formed a t-shaped garment when laid flat with the sides wrapping around to buckle at the back. Sometimes the front and back pieces were separate and might be laced or buckled at the sides.
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A '''pair of plates''' (modern: ''[[coat-of-plates]]'') is a term used to describe the type of [[armour]] that consisted of [[metal]] (typically [[iron]]) [[plate]]s rivetted to the inside of a [[fabric]] or [[leather]] covering. Sometimes the [[plate]]s might be found onthe outside of the [[armour]]. The covering typically formed a t-shaped garment when laid flat with the sides wrapping around to buckle at the back. Sometimes the front and back pieces were separate and might be laced or buckled at the sides.
   
 
This was the most common of body [[armour]] from the beginning of the [[14th century]] up until sometime in the 1360's and most of the knights at [[Battle of Crecy|Crecy]] and [[Battle of Poitiers|Poitiers]] fought wearing this [[armour]].
 
This was the most common of body [[armour]] from the beginning of the [[14th century]] up until sometime in the 1360's and most of the knights at [[Battle of Crecy|Crecy]] and [[Battle of Poitiers|Poitiers]] fought wearing this [[armour]].

Latest revision as of 14:26, 26 March 2011

A pair of plates (modern: coat-of-plates) is a term used to describe the type of armour that consisted of metal (typically iron) plates rivetted to the inside of a fabric or leather covering. Sometimes the plates might be found onthe outside of the armour. The covering typically formed a t-shaped garment when laid flat with the sides wrapping around to buckle at the back. Sometimes the front and back pieces were separate and might be laced or buckled at the sides.

This was the most common of body armour from the beginning of the 14th century up until sometime in the 1360's and most of the knights at Crecy and Poitiers fought wearing this armour.

Some of the best known known examples of this type of armour come from the Battle of Wisby fought in Wisby in 1361.