Difference between revisions of "Opus Anglicanum"

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=== Background ===
 
=== Background ===
   
'''Opus Anglicanum''' is the term used in [[medieval]] continental inventories to describe [[England|English]] [[embroidery]]. It was famed for its fine [[goldwork]] and skilful use of the techniques of [[underside couching]] and [[split stitch]]. Such embroidery was used for both [[ecclesiastical]] and [[secular textiles]], although very few of the latter have survived.
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'''Opus Anglicanum''' is the term used in [[medieval]] continental inventories to describe [[England|English]] [[embroidery]]. It was famed for its fine [[goldwork]] and skilful use of the techniques of [[Underside Couching|underside couching]] and [[split stitch]]. Such embroidery was used for both [[ecclesiastical]] and [[secular textiles]], although very few of the latter have survived.
   
 
This high quality English embroidery was made of expensive imported materials and was very labour intensive. [[Nun]]s and [[noble]]women did a great deal of embroidery as one would expect, but large embroideries like the [[Syon Cope]] were made by highly trained professionals, both men and women. They were employed in workshops which were funded by [[merchant]]s and noble [[patron]]s. It was the merchants who took the profits, not the embroiderers who received only modest payments for their work. Most workshops were in [[London]] where the necessary capital was available and which was the principal [[port]] through which the imported materials arrived.
 
This high quality English embroidery was made of expensive imported materials and was very labour intensive. [[Nun]]s and [[noble]]women did a great deal of embroidery as one would expect, but large embroideries like the [[Syon Cope]] were made by highly trained professionals, both men and women. They were employed in workshops which were funded by [[merchant]]s and noble [[patron]]s. It was the merchants who took the profits, not the embroiderers who received only modest payments for their work. Most workshops were in [[London]] where the necessary capital was available and which was the principal [[port]] through which the imported materials arrived.

Latest revision as of 16:50, 29 June 2006