Difference between revisions of "Old Norse alternate titles"

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If the sagas, written in Old Norse are any indication, then the title (or occupational byname) comes after your first name. Then comes a descriptive byname, a locative, and finally a patronymic (or, more rarely, matronymic). So while in English his name is <b>King</b> Harald Fine-hair, in Old Norse he is Haraldr <b>konungr</b> inn hárfagri. Similarly, the 13th century <b>King</b> Haakon Haakonarson is Hákon <b>konungr</b> Hákonarson in Old Norse. It also seems to be generally written in lower-case, too.
  
 
[[Category:alternate titles]]
 
[[Category:alternate titles]]
 
[[Category:viking]]
 
[[Category:viking]]

Revision as of 21:28, 9 February 2012

In the SCA people with a Viking persona may choose to use one of the following alternate titles.

SCA Old Norse
King Konungr
Queen Drottning
Duke Hertogi
Count Jarl, Greifi
Countess Greifynja
Master Meistari
Knight Riddari
Sir Riddari
Baron Hersir

If the sagas, written in Old Norse are any indication, then the title (or occupational byname) comes after your first name. Then comes a descriptive byname, a locative, and finally a patronymic (or, more rarely, matronymic). So while in English his name is King Harald Fine-hair, in Old Norse he is Haraldr konungr inn hárfagri. Similarly, the 13th century King Haakon Haakonarson is Hákon konungr Hákonarson in Old Norse. It also seems to be generally written in lower-case, too.