Difference between revisions of "Old Norse Religion"

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* Freyr & Freyja (twin brother and sister, they were the deities of love, sex, and fertility; they belonged to the lesser race of Vanir and their joint day is Friday; Freya is also identified with Venus)
 
* Freyr & Freyja (twin brother and sister, they were the deities of love, sex, and fertility; they belonged to the lesser race of Vanir and their joint day is Friday; Freya is also identified with Venus)
* Tyr/Tiw (god of law and warfare, his cult was not widespread among the Vikings; due to oath-breaking, he was obliged to sacrifice one of his hands to the wolf, Fenris)
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* Tyr/Tiw (god of law and warfare, his cult was not widespread among the Vikings; due to oath-breaking, he was obliged to sacrifice one of his hands to the wolf, Fenris; he is associated with the day Tuesday, and he is identified with Mars)
 
== an ethnic faith ==
 
== an ethnic faith ==
 
Unlike universal religions such as [[Christian]]ity and [[Islam]], the Old Norse religion did not actively seek converts. One became a worshipper of the gods by virtue of one's birth or by marrying into a Norse family. Outsiders had their own gods to watch over them, and any stranger seeking to convert would most likely have been considered a social outcast. As the Vikings settled in news lands, they began to adopt the religious traditions of their neighbors, especially Christianity. Many of the Norse however clung to both traditions, publicly professing Christianity, while worshipping the old gods in private.
 
Unlike universal religions such as [[Christian]]ity and [[Islam]], the Old Norse religion did not actively seek converts. One became a worshipper of the gods by virtue of one's birth or by marrying into a Norse family. Outsiders had their own gods to watch over them, and any stranger seeking to convert would most likely have been considered a social outcast. As the Vikings settled in news lands, they began to adopt the religious traditions of their neighbors, especially Christianity. Many of the Norse however clung to both traditions, publicly professing Christianity, while worshipping the old gods in private.

Revision as of 08:36, 22 December 2006