Difference between revisions of "Old English"

From Cunnan
Jump to navigationJump to search
Line 1: Line 1:
'''Old English''' is an early form of the english [[language]] that was spoken in [[England]] around 1000 years ago. It is sometimes called [[anglo-saxon]]. The language spoken in England is considered Old English [[450]][[AD]] until some time after the [[Norman]] invasion of england (around [[1066]][[AD]]), when it becomes [[Middle English]]. Most Old English texts are now [[/Transliteration|transliterated]] rather than being produced in [[period]] typefaces.  
+
'''Old English''' is an early form of the english [[language]] that was spoken in [[England]] around 1000 years ago. It is sometimes called [[anglo-saxon]]. The language spoken in England is considered Old English [[450]][[AD]] until some time after the [[Norman]] invasion of england (around [[1066]][[AD]]), when it becomes [[Middle English]]. Most Old English texts are now [[Transliteration|transliterated]] rather than being produced in [[period]] typefaces.  
  
 
== Major differences from modern English ==
 
== Major differences from modern English ==
Line 7: Line 7:
  
 
== Samples of Old English ==
 
== Samples of Old English ==
=== [[Beowulf]] (circa [[900]][[AD]]) ===
+
=== Beowulf (circa 900 AD) ===
Beowulf is a traditional heroic epic poem in Old English alliterative verse. At 3182 lines, it is far more substantial than any similar work in the language, representing about 10% of the extant Anglo-Saxon corpus. The poem is untitled in the manuscript, but has been known as Beowulf since the early [[19th century]].
+
[[Beowulf]] is a traditional heroic epic poem in Old English alliterative verse. At 3182 lines, it is far more substantial than any similar work in the language, representing about 10% of the extant [[Anglo-Saxon]] corpus. The poem is untitled in the [[manuscript]], but has been known as Beowulf since the early [[19th century]].
  
 
The [[Project Gutenberg]] e-text of Beowulf can be found at http://library.adelaide.edu.au/etext/pg/etext97/bwulf10.txt
 
The [[Project Gutenberg]] e-text of Beowulf can be found at http://library.adelaide.edu.au/etext/pg/etext97/bwulf10.txt
Line 15: Line 15:
 
Many early examples of old english (and other period languages) are of a religious nature. The Lord's Prayer is a good example of the change in [[English]] over time.
 
Many early examples of old english (and other period languages) are of a religious nature. The Lord's Prayer is a good example of the change in [[English]] over time.
  
Dated [[1611]] AD.
+
====Dated 1611 AD.====
::Our father which art in heauen,
+
:Our father which art in heauen,
::hallowed be thy name.
+
:hallowed be thy name.
::Thy kingdom come.
+
:Thy kingdom come.
::Thy will be done in earth as it is in heauen.
+
:Thy will be done in earth as it is in heauen.
::Giue us this day our daily bread.
+
:Giue us this day our daily bread.
::And forgiue us our debts as we forgiue our debters.
+
:And forgiue us our debts as we forgiue our debters.
::And lead us not into temptation,
+
:And lead us not into temptation,
::but deliuer us from euill.
+
:but deliuer us from euill.
::Amen.
+
:Amen.
  
Dated [[1384]] AD.
+
Most modern English speakers should be able to understand this version of the Lord's Prayer. Note the use of u in place of v. It is not until fairly recently that u an v have been considered separate letters (a good example of this can be seen in the glossary of the [[Forme of Cury]]).
be
 
to be.
 
in heuene.
 
::yeue to us today oure eche dayes bred.
 
is in us.
 
::And lede us not into temptacion but delyuere us from euyl.
 
  
Dated circa [[1000]] AD.
+
====Dated 1384 AD. ====
:
+
 +
 +
 +
:yeue to us today oure eche dayes bred.
 +
 +
:And lede us not into temptacion but delyuere us from euyl.
 +
 
 +
 +
 
 +
====Dated circa 1000 AD.====
 +
.
 +
 
 +
This version of the Lord's Prayer probably isn't recognizable by the majority of modern English speakers. 1000 AD is before the [[Norman]] [[invasion]] of [[England]] and therefore many of the words in Modern English that were taken from french are not yet present in the Language.

Revision as of 14:13, 30 November 2003