Difference between revisions of "Murrey"

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<div style="float:right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em;">[[Image:murrey.PNG]]</div>
In [[heraldry]], '''murrey''' indicates a purple-red, or mulberry, [[tincture]]. It is classified as one of the [[stains]] and so its use is extremely rare in English heraldry. Sometimes murrey is regarded as a distinct heraldic color, and sometimes it is considered the same as [[sanguine]].
 
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In [[heraldry]], '''murrey''' indicates a purple-red, or mulberry, [[tincture]]. It is classified as one of the [[stains]] and so its use is extremely rare in English heraldry. In earlier times murrey was not usually considered a distinct heraldic [[tincture]] from [[sanguine]], but in the present, post-Victorian period, they are almost always distinguished.
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As [[gules]] was used as livery for the royal household in [[England]], and was therefore reserved, many other households who would otherwise have used gules for their [[livery]], used murrey instead.
   
 
[[Category:Device heraldry]]
 
[[Category:Device heraldry]]

Latest revision as of 09:50, 10 November 2007

Murrey.PNG

In heraldry, murrey indicates a purple-red, or mulberry, tincture. It is classified as one of the stains and so its use is extremely rare in English heraldry. In earlier times murrey was not usually considered a distinct heraldic tincture from sanguine, but in the present, post-Victorian period, they are almost always distinguished.

As gules was used as livery for the royal household in England, and was therefore reserved, many other households who would otherwise have used gules for their livery, used murrey instead.