Difference between revisions of "Livery"

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The term '''livery''' refers to a visual method of identifying the servants or [[retainer]]s of a lord.  
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The term '''livery''' refers to a visual method of identifying the [[servant]]s or [[retainer]]s of a [[lord]].  
  
This livery might include a [[badge]] and often extended to the colours of the clothing of a lord. These colours could, but did not always, extend to that of the lord's coat of arms.
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This livery might include a [[badge]] and often extended to the colours of the [[clothing]] of a lord. These colours could, but did not always, extend to that of the lord's [[coat of arms]].
  
Famous examples include the white ragged staff of the Earl of Warwick during the [[Wars of the Roses]] or the red and black colouring and Stafford knot of the Duke of Buckingham during the same period.
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Famous examples include the white ragged staff of the [[Earl]] of Warwick during the [[Wars of the Roses]] or the red and black colouring and [[Stafford knot]] of the [[Duke]] of Buckingham during the same period.

Revision as of 11:38, 9 February 2006

The term livery refers to a visual method of identifying the servants or retainers of a lord.

This livery might include a badge and often extended to the colours of the clothing of a lord. These colours could, but did not always, extend to that of the lord's coat of arms.

Famous examples include the white ragged staff of the Earl of Warwick during the Wars of the Roses or the red and black colouring and Stafford knot of the Duke of Buckingham during the same period.