Difference between revisions of "Heresy"

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* [http://en2.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arianism Arianism]
 
* [http://en2.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arianism Arianism]
 
* [http://en2.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathar Catharism]
 
* [http://en2.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathar Catharism]
* [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lollardy Lollardy], or the following of the teachings of [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wyclif John Wyclif]. This was closely related to the teachings of the [http://en2.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hussite Hussites] after [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan Hus] Jan Hus.
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* [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lollardy Lollardy], or the following of the teachings of [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wyclif John Wyclif]. This was closely related to the teachings of the [http://en2.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hussite Hussites] after [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Hus Jan Hus].
 
* According to Mary I of England, Elizabeth I was a [[Heretic]]. According to Elizabeth I, Mary I was a [[Heretic]]
 
* According to Mary I of England, Elizabeth I was a [[Heretic]]. According to Elizabeth I, Mary I was a [[Heretic]]
   

Revision as of 16:33, 12 November 2003

Heresy is the expression or following of a dogma, doctrine or religious belief that is different to the one mandated by the powers that be -- often the Catholic Church although the various Protestant powers of the reformation in turned branded many Catholic doctrines as heresy.

So, being a heretic really depended on what side of the argument that you are on.

Some of the common doctrines branded as heresy during the [Middle Ages]] and Renaissance include:

References