Difference between revisions of "Harold Godwinson"

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At about the same time, King [[Edward the Confessor|Edward]] had sent Harold as his envoy to Normandy, and to its duke, William, to whom Edward had promised the English throne some 10 years earlier, impressed by the [[Norman]] skill of government. In the course of his visit (which began with shipwreck) Harold swore on holy relics to uphold William's right to succeed (although he was later, whilst acknowledging the oath, to say that it had been given under duress and without knowledge of the relics -- a mere spoken promise).
 
At about the same time, King [[Edward the Confessor|Edward]] had sent Harold as his envoy to Normandy, and to its duke, William, to whom Edward had promised the English throne some 10 years earlier, impressed by the [[Norman]] skill of government. In the course of his visit (which began with shipwreck) Harold swore on holy relics to uphold William's right to succeed (although he was later, whilst acknowledging the oath, to say that it had been given under duress and without knowledge of the relics -- a mere spoken promise).
   
Upon Edward the Confessors death on (January 5 1066), however, Harold claimed that Edward had promised him the crown on his deathbed, and compelled the Witenagemot (the assembly of the kingdom's leading notables) to approve him for coronation as king, which then took place on the following day.
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Upon Edward the Confessor's death on (January 5 1066), however, Harold claimed that Edward had promised him the crown on his deathbed, and compelled the Witenagemot (the assembly of the kingdom's leading notables) to approve him for coronation as king, which then took place on the following day.
   
 
However, the country was invaded, by both Harald of Norway and [[William the Conqueror|William]], [[Duke]] of [[Normandy]]. The first argued that he had an hereditary right (and a strong enough army) to govern [[England]], while [[William]] pointed out that in accepting the crown of England, Harold had perjured himself of his recent oath.
 
However, the country was invaded, by both Harald of Norway and [[William the Conqueror|William]], [[Duke]] of [[Normandy]]. The first argued that he had an hereditary right (and a strong enough army) to govern [[England]], while [[William]] pointed out that in accepting the crown of England, Harold had perjured himself of his recent oath.

Revision as of 18:34, 5 January 2005