Difference between revisions of "Harold Godwinson"

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In 1058 Harold also became Earl of Hereford, and he replaced his late father as the focus of opposition to growing [[Norman]] influence in England under the restored Saxon monarchy of [[Edward the Confessor]], who had spent more than a quarter of a century in exile in Normandy.
 
In 1058 Harold also became Earl of Hereford, and he replaced his late father as the focus of opposition to growing [[Norman]] influence in England under the restored Saxon monarchy of [[Edward the Confessor]], who had spent more than a quarter of a century in exile in Normandy.
   
Harold sought glory in a series of campaigns, between 1062 and 1063 against the ruler of [[Gwynedd]] in [[Wales]], Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, who had conquered all of [[Wales]]; this conflict ended with Gruffydd's defeat (and death at the hands of his own troops) in 1063. Around 1064, Harold married Edith, daughter of the Earl of Mercia, who was also the former wife of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn. By Harold, Edith had two sons - possibly twins - named Harold and Ulf, both of whom survived into adulthood and probably ended their lives in exile. Harold entered into this marriage (which amassed even more opower for him) despite that fact that, by the Danish law then pertinent, he was already married to Ealdgyth or Edith, known as the "swan-neck", by whom he had several (possibly 5) children.
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Harold sought glory in a series of campaigns, between 1062 and 1063 against the ruler of [[Gwynedd]] in [[Wales]], Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, who had conquered all of [[Wales]]; this conflict ended with Gruffydd's defeat (and death at the hands of his own troops) in 1063. Around 1064, Harold married Edith, daughter of the Earl of Mercia, who was also the former wife of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn. By Harold, Edith had two sons - possibly twins - named Harold and Ulf, both of whom survived into adulthood and probably ended their lives in exile. Harold entered into this marriage (which amassed even more power for him) despite that fact that, by the Danish law then pertinent, he was already married to Ealdgyth or Edith, known as the "swan-neck", by whom he had several (possibly 5) children.
   
 
In 1065 Harold supported a rebellion against his brother Tostig, Earl of Northumbria, who was replaced by Morcar. This strengthened Harold's acceptability as Edward's successor, but fatally divided his own family, driving Tostig into alliance with [[Harald Hardrada]], [[King]] of [[Norway]].
 
In 1065 Harold supported a rebellion against his brother Tostig, Earl of Northumbria, who was replaced by Morcar. This strengthened Harold's acceptability as Edward's successor, but fatally divided his own family, driving Tostig into alliance with [[Harald Hardrada]], [[King]] of [[Norway]].

Revision as of 21:28, 28 October 2005