Difference between revisions of "Green dye"

From Cunnan
Jump to navigationJump to search
(Added external link)
Line 1: Line 1:
 +
bastalicab
 
Contrary to popular misconception, good green colours were hard to produce on fabric with [[dyestuff]]s. Some dull and pale greens (brownish, greyish, or yellowish coloured) can be produced from plant matter, however the bright green colour of plants is not easily transfered to fabric. (despite all the evidence of grass stains). To get a nice clear green, fabric was first dyed with a [[yellow dye]] (eg [[weld]], [[dyer's greenweed]]) and then, once dry, [[overdyed]] with a [[blue dye]] ([[woad]]). As such a "good" green fabric might conceivably cost more than a blue fabric.
 
Contrary to popular misconception, good green colours were hard to produce on fabric with [[dyestuff]]s. Some dull and pale greens (brownish, greyish, or yellowish coloured) can be produced from plant matter, however the bright green colour of plants is not easily transfered to fabric. (despite all the evidence of grass stains). To get a nice clear green, fabric was first dyed with a [[yellow dye]] (eg [[weld]], [[dyer's greenweed]]) and then, once dry, [[overdyed]] with a [[blue dye]] ([[woad]]). As such a "good" green fabric might conceivably cost more than a blue fabric.
  

Revision as of 20:58, 10 November 2007

bastalicab Contrary to popular misconception, good green colours were hard to produce on fabric with dyestuffs. Some dull and pale greens (brownish, greyish, or yellowish coloured) can be produced from plant matter, however the bright green colour of plants is not easily transfered to fabric. (despite all the evidence of grass stains). To get a nice clear green, fabric was first dyed with a yellow dye (eg weld, dyer's greenweed) and then, once dry, overdyed with a blue dye (woad). As such a "good" green fabric might conceivably cost more than a blue fabric.

Sources of period recipes for green dyes