Difference between revisions of "Grains of Paradise"

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Grains of Paradise (Aframomum melegueta), also known as melegueta pepper, Guinea grains, Guinea pepper and alligator pepper are native to West Africa. Grains of paradise are related to cardamom, and were previously an important spice, especially around the 14th and 15th centuries. Today they are not used much outside of West and North Africa. Grains of paradise are pungent and aromatic, and are used sometimes to flavor vinegars, beer and wine, in herbal remedies and in veterinary medicines.
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'''Grains of Paradise''' (''Aframomum melegueta''), also known as melegueta pepper, Guinea grains, Guinea pepper and alligator pepper are native to West Africa. Grains of paradise are related to [[cardamon]], and were previously an important [[spice]], especially around the [[14th century|14th]] and [[15th century|15th]] centuries. Today they are not used much outside of West and North Africa. Grains of paradise are pungent and aromatic, and are used sometimes to flavor [[vinegar]]s, [[beer]] and [[wine]], in herbal remedies and in veterinary medicines.
   
 
[[category:spices]]
 
[[category:spices]]

Latest revision as of 23:13, 5 June 2005

Grains of Paradise (Aframomum melegueta), also known as melegueta pepper, Guinea grains, Guinea pepper and alligator pepper are native to West Africa. Grains of paradise are related to cardamon, and were previously an important spice, especially around the 14th and 15th centuries. Today they are not used much outside of West and North Africa. Grains of paradise are pungent and aromatic, and are used sometimes to flavor vinegars, beer and wine, in herbal remedies and in veterinary medicines.