Difference between revisions of "Galliard"

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(various additions and corrections)
(added part about turning in the fancy steps)
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[[Arbeau]] writes that the galliard is also called a five step, and is a "quick and gay dance" most suitable for young folk.  It is closely related to the [[tourdion]] which can be considered a smaller and faster form of Galliard.
 
[[Arbeau]] writes that the galliard is also called a five step, and is a "quick and gay dance" most suitable for young folk.  It is closely related to the [[tourdion]] which can be considered a smaller and faster form of Galliard.
  
The dance begins with a gentleman holding a lady by the hand. He [[reverence]]s to her and the dance begins. The pair circle the room, dancing gently (tourdion fashion) or else simply walking, and then the lady dances away alone. The gentleman, now free to perform more boisterous kicks, follows untill he stands in front of the lady.  In this position he can exhibit his most elabourate and boisterous steps for the lady and audience.
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The dance begins with a gentleman holding a lady by the hand. He [[reverence]]s to her and the dance begins. The pair circle the room, dancing gently (tourdion fashion) or else simply walking, and then the lady dances away alone. The gentleman, now free to perform more boisterous kicks, follows untill he stands in front of the lady.  In this position he can exhibit his most elabourate and boisterous steps for the lady and audience, and he turns once per six-count bar as he does these steps.
  
 
The galliard consists of four steps, whose composition varies, followed by a [[saut majeur]] and [[posture]]. This is accompanied by music with six beats, although normally the 5th beat may be a rest.
 
The galliard consists of four steps, whose composition varies, followed by a [[saut majeur]] and [[posture]]. This is accompanied by music with six beats, although normally the 5th beat may be a rest.

Revision as of 22:27, 22 February 2006