Difference between revisions of "Execution"

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An '''execution''' is the judicial version of [[murder]] -- that is to say, the deceased was deceased as a result of something bearing a resemblance to a "sentence of a lawful court", as opposed to simply happening because A wanted B dead.
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An '''execution''' is the carrying out of a judicial sentence of death.
  
 
Executions originate in pre-history (which is to say that almost every civilization's remaining records talk of them, in one way or another), and continue throughout [[period]].  Methods varied, from the stoning of the Hebrews and the crucifixions of the [[Roman Empire|Roman]]s in Palestine, to the decapitation of [[Tudor]] [[England]] and the garrote of [[Ottoman Empire|Ottoman]] [[Turkey]]
 
Executions originate in pre-history (which is to say that almost every civilization's remaining records talk of them, in one way or another), and continue throughout [[period]].  Methods varied, from the stoning of the Hebrews and the crucifixions of the [[Roman Empire|Roman]]s in Palestine, to the decapitation of [[Tudor]] [[England]] and the garrote of [[Ottoman Empire|Ottoman]] [[Turkey]]
  
 
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Latest revision as of 12:33, 5 October 2008

An execution is the carrying out of a judicial sentence of death.

Executions originate in pre-history (which is to say that almost every civilization's remaining records talk of them, in one way or another), and continue throughout period. Methods varied, from the stoning of the Hebrews and the crucifixions of the Romans in Palestine, to the decapitation of Tudor England and the garrote of Ottoman Turkey


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