Difference between revisions of "Eadric Streona"

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In battle at Ashingdon, Eadric went back over to Cnut, and Edmund was defeated, fleeing to Gloucestershire. The two agreed to split the kingdom, which lasted until Edmund died (or was murdered, possibly by Eadric) in November 1016. <br>
 
In battle at Ashingdon, Eadric went back over to Cnut, and Edmund was defeated, fleeing to Gloucestershire. The two agreed to split the kingdom, which lasted until Edmund died (or was murdered, possibly by Eadric) in November 1016. <br>
 
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Left, in 1017, as sole king, [[Canute the Great|Cnut]] gave Eadric the earldom of Mercia. Then he had second thoughts, and (according to the Chroniclers) asked Eadric how he could be sure, given his past history of betrayals, that he would remain loyal this time. To ensure his loyalty Cnut had Eadric executed. Eadgyth Cnut gave to another earl, Thorkell, of East Anglia, even while he himself was marrying Ethelred's widow, Aelgifu.
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Left, in 1017, as sole king, [[Canute the Great|Cnut]] gave Eadric the earldom of Mercia. Then he had second thoughts, and (according to the Chroniclers) asked Eadric how he could be sure, given his past history of betrayals, that he would remain loyal this time. To ensure his loyalty Cnut had Eadric executed. Eadgyth Cnut gave to another earl, Thorkell, of East Anglia, even while he himself was marrying Ethelred's widow, Aelgifu. <br>
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A play ''Edmond Ironside'', written in the Elizabethan style, protrays Eadric as a villain of [[Richard iii|Ricardian]] hue, making him hate [[Edmund Ironside|Edmund]] for reminding Eadric of his base birth, whilst [[Canute the Great|Cnut]] valued him heedless of his origins.
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It also features an incident in which Eadric produces what he says is Edmund's head in order to induce his troops to surrender. The play has sometimes been ascribed to [[Shakespeare]], but the attribution is widly challenged, not least on the grounds that the play is rambling and poorly organised. Eadric as a character is, however, acknowleged as a prototypical Elizabethan villain.

Revision as of 19:48, 5 January 2005