Difference between revisions of "Double Left (Haut Barrois)"

From Cunnan
Jump to: navigation, search
m (different character for e-acute)
m (different character for e-grave)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
The double left, as done in the [[Haut Barrois Branle|branle du Haut Barrois]], is the same as an ordinary [[double left (branle)|branle double left]], except that it is done with running steps, springing off the floor between each step and the next: spring to left onto the left foot, spring onto the right foot approaching where the left foot was, spring to left onto the left foot, and then spring onto both feet joined.
 
The double left, as done in the [[Haut Barrois Branle|branle du Haut Barrois]], is the same as an ordinary [[double left (branle)|branle double left]], except that it is done with running steps, springing off the floor between each step and the next: spring to left onto the left foot, spring onto the right foot approaching where the left foot was, spring to left onto the left foot, and then spring onto both feet joined.
  
Instead of joining the feet at the end, one may hop on the left foot while kicking forward with the right foot ([[gréve droite]] or [[pied en l'air droit]]).
+
Instead of joining the feet at the end, one may hop on the left foot while kicking forward with the right foot ([[grève droite]] or [[pied en l'air droit]]).
  
 
Other versions of this step have been proposed. In one version, there is a full hop between each step and the next, but this is not supported by Arbeau's own definition of [[saut]], which emphasizes elevation (at the middle of the saut) rather than rising from the ground or landing. In another version, one lands on both feet for each step, but this is not consistent with the original French, in which every step except the final [[pieds joints]] is done by a foot in the singular.
 
Other versions of this step have been proposed. In one version, there is a full hop between each step and the next, but this is not supported by Arbeau's own definition of [[saut]], which emphasizes elevation (at the middle of the saut) rather than rising from the ground or landing. In another version, one lands on both feet for each step, but this is not consistent with the original French, in which every step except the final [[pieds joints]] is done by a foot in the singular.

Latest revision as of 11:09, 13 September 2009

The double left, as done in the branle du Haut Barrois, is the same as an ordinary branle double left, except that it is done with running steps, springing off the floor between each step and the next: spring to left onto the left foot, spring onto the right foot approaching where the left foot was, spring to left onto the left foot, and then spring onto both feet joined.

Instead of joining the feet at the end, one may hop on the left foot while kicking forward with the right foot (grève droite or pied en l'air droit).

Other versions of this step have been proposed. In one version, there is a full hop between each step and the next, but this is not supported by Arbeau's own definition of saut, which emphasizes elevation (at the middle of the saut) rather than rising from the ground or landing. In another version, one lands on both feet for each step, but this is not consistent with the original French, in which every step except the final pieds joints is done by a foot in the singular.

See also Double Right (Haut Barrois)