Difference between revisions of "Cordial"

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A '''cordial''' is a [[tonic]] made from plant matter (eg [[fruit]]s, [[vegetables]], leaves). [[Medieval]] cordials could be [[alcohol]]ic or non-alcoholic, and were generally consumed for their presumed good effects upon the person's health. [[Sekanjabin]] is an good example of a simple non-alcoholic cordial.
 
A '''cordial''' is a [[tonic]] made from plant matter (eg [[fruit]]s, [[vegetables]], leaves). [[Medieval]] cordials could be [[alcohol]]ic or non-alcoholic, and were generally consumed for their presumed good effects upon the person's health. [[Sekanjabin]] is an good example of a simple non-alcoholic cordial.
   
Modern fruit cordials (concentrates of fruit juice and [[sugar]] which are diluted with water) available in [[Australia]] (but strangely rare in northern [[Europe]] and [[North America]]) bear some similarity to certain medieval cordials, and are thus often provided to drink at feasts in [[Lochac]].
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Modern fruit cordials (concentrates of fruit juice and [[sugar]] which are diluted with water) available in [[Australia]] (but strangely rare in northern [[Europe]] and [[North America]] - the North American equivalent is a powder rather than a syrup, such as Kool-Aid) bear some similarity to certain medieval cordials, and are thus often provided to drink at feasts in [[Lochac]].
   
 
==Specific cordials==
 
==Specific cordials==

Latest revision as of 01:07, 28 February 2010

A cordial is a tonic made from plant matter (eg fruits, vegetables, leaves). Medieval cordials could be alcoholic or non-alcoholic, and were generally consumed for their presumed good effects upon the person's health. Sekanjabin is an good example of a simple non-alcoholic cordial.

Modern fruit cordials (concentrates of fruit juice and sugar which are diluted with water) available in Australia (but strangely rare in northern Europe and North America - the North American equivalent is a powder rather than a syrup, such as Kool-Aid) bear some similarity to certain medieval cordials, and are thus often provided to drink at feasts in Lochac.

Specific cordials

Non-alcholic

Alcoholic

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