Difference between revisions of "Colour"

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The word "colour" is problematic.  [[Herald]]s prefer to use "tincture" for what ordinary people call colours, because "colour" has a different meaning.
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The word "colour" is problematic.  [[Herald]]s prefer to use "[[tincture]]" for what ordinary people call colours, because "colour" has a different meaning.
  
There are three kinds of tincture: colours, [[metal]]s and [[fur]]s.  With one exception, everything on a heraldic [[device]] must be in these tinctures.
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''See also:''
 
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* [[Tincture]]
The five colours, in approximate order from most to least common, are:
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* [[Dye colours]]
* [[Sable]] ([[black]])
 
* [[Gules]] ([[red]])
 
* [[Azure]] ([[blue]])
 
* [[Vert]] ([[green]])
 
* [[Purpure]] ([[purple]])
 
 
 
The two metals are:
 
*[[Or]] ([[yellow]] or [[gold]])
 
*[[Argent]] ([[silver]] or [[white]])
 
 
 
The furs are many, but the most common ones are:
 
*[[Ermine]] (black ermine spots on a white field)
 
*[[Counter-ermine]] (white ermine spots on black)
 
*[[Erminois]] (black ermine spots on yellow)
 
*[[Pean]] (yellow ermine spots on black)
 
*[[Vair]] (a regular pattern of blue and white)
 
 
 
(Note that counter-ermine is called ermines in the literature, but we use the longer name to help stave off typos.)
 
 
 
The one exception to these tinctures is called '[[proper]]'.  If an creature has a normal, unarguable colouration, then it may be described as proper.  For example, a greyhound proper would be grey, or a man proper would be pale pink (in [[Europe]] at least).  This has some implications for matters of [[contrast]].  If there is no normal colour for a creature - lions, for example, can be anything from white through yellow to black - or if it's a mythical beast, then it doesn't have a proper colour, so this exception doesn't apply.  ((Need to quote precedent here?))
 

Revision as of 17:54, 29 August 2003

The word "colour" is problematic. Heralds prefer to use "tincture" for what ordinary people call colours, because "colour" has a different meaning.

See also: