Difference between revisions of "Citrine"

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'''Citrine''' is a pale yellow variety of quartz. Natural citrine is rare; most of it on the market is actually heat-treated amethyst. In ancient times citrine was known as ''chryselectrum'', a catch-all term that included topaz, citrine, amber, and perhaps even golden beryl. During the Middle Ages citrine was frequently confused with golden topaz. Even in the mid-twentieth century it was often sold as "citrine topaz".
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'''Citrine''' is a pale [[yellow]] variety of quartz. Natural citrine is rare; most of it on the market is actually heat-treated amethyst. In [[ancient]] times citrine was known as ''chryselectrum'', a catch-all term that included topaz, citrine, [[amber]], and perhaps even golden beryl. During the [[Middle Ages]] citrine was frequently confused with golden topaz. Even in the mid-twentieth century it was often sold as "citrine topaz".
 
[[category:gemstones]]
 
[[category:gemstones]]

Latest revision as of 09:16, 10 November 2006

Citrine is a pale yellow variety of quartz. Natural citrine is rare; most of it on the market is actually heat-treated amethyst. In ancient times citrine was known as chryselectrum, a catch-all term that included topaz, citrine, amber, and perhaps even golden beryl. During the Middle Ages citrine was frequently confused with golden topaz. Even in the mid-twentieth century it was often sold as "citrine topaz".