Difference between revisions of "Branle"

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(Branle suites)
(→‎Regional Branles: corrections about Arbeau's Scottish branles, sp)
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==Regional Branles==
 
==Regional Branles==
  
Arbeau gives choreographies for four Branles which are associated with specific regions, the [[Breton Branle]], the [[Burgundian Branle]] (see above), the [[Poitou Branle]] and the [[Scottish Branle]]. Aside from the Burgundian Branle each of these dances seem to have a genuine connection to the region, particularly the Breton Branle. Some [[16th century]] books also contain music entitled Champagne Branle, which Arbeau tells us is another name for Burgundian.
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Arbeau gives choreographies for five Branles which are associated with specific regions, the [[Breton Branle]], the [[Burgundian Branle]] (see above), the [[Poitou Branle]] and the [[Scottish Branle]]s. Aside from the Burgundian Branle each of these dances seem to have a genuine connection to the region, particularly the Breton Branle. Some [[16th century]] books also contain music entitled Champagne Branle, which Arbeau tells us is another name for Burgundian.
  
 
===Musical Characteristics of the Regional Branles===
 
===Musical Characteristics of the Regional Branles===
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Although the Breton Branle is rarely mentioned outside Arbeau the other two dance styles seems to have provided a little more inspiration to composers.
 
Although the Breton Branle is rarely mentioned outside Arbeau the other two dance styles seems to have provided a little more inspiration to composers.
  
According to Mable Dolmetsch the Branle was referred to as the Brail in [[Scotland]]. As described by Arbeau it is in 4/4 time and is split into two repeated sections. The first with musical phrases of 2, 2, 1 and 1 bars, the second with phrases of 2, 1, 1 and 2. Two examples of music called the Scottish Branle by [[Estienne du Tertre]], however, appear in 3/4 time. Furthermore, despite a similarity in structure for one of these branles, the precise choreography given by Arbeau could not be danced to this music even if the music were in 4/4.
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According to Mabel Dolmetsch the Branle was referred to as the Brail in [[Scotland]]. As described by Arbeau it is in duple time. The first Scottish branle has musical phrases of 2 bars, the second phrases of 2 and 3 bars. Two examples of music called the Scottish Branle by [[Estienne du Tertre]], however, appear in 3/4 time. Furthermore, despite a similarity in structure for one of these branles, the precise choreography given by Arbeau could not be danced to this music even if the music were in 4/4.
  
 
The Poitou Branle usually has a 9/4 metre, although some settings use 6/4 or even alternate between 6/4 and 9/4. There is a variation called the [[Poitou double Branle]] (''Branle double de Poitou''), which appears exclusively in 6/4.
 
The Poitou Branle usually has a 9/4 metre, although some settings use 6/4 or even alternate between 6/4 and 9/4. There is a variation called the [[Poitou double Branle]] (''Branle double de Poitou''), which appears exclusively in 6/4.

Revision as of 17:06, 22 February 2006