Difference between revisions of "Branle"

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Arbeau gives choreographies for four Branles which are associated with specific regions, the [[Breton Branle]], the [[Burgundian Branle]] (see above), the [[Poitou Branle]] and the [[Scottish Branle]]. Aside from the Burgundian Branle each of these dances seem to have a genuine connection to the region, particularly the Breton Branle. Some [[16th century]] books also contain music entitled Champagne Branle, which Arbeau tells us is another name for Burgundian.
 
Arbeau gives choreographies for four Branles which are associated with specific regions, the [[Breton Branle]], the [[Burgundian Branle]] (see above), the [[Poitou Branle]] and the [[Scottish Branle]]. Aside from the Burgundian Branle each of these dances seem to have a genuine connection to the region, particularly the Breton Branle. Some [[16th century]] books also contain music entitled Champagne Branle, which Arbeau tells us is another name for Burgundian.
  
===Musical Charcteristics of the Regional Branles===
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===Musical Characteristics of the Regional Branles===
  
 
Although the Breton Branle is rarely mentioned outside Arbeau the other two dance styles seems to have provided a little more inspiration to composers.
 
Although the Breton Branle is rarely mentioned outside Arbeau the other two dance styles seems to have provided a little more inspiration to composers.
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There were a number of pieces of music from as early as 1550 called ''Branle de Village'', and they seem to have gained popularity in the early [[17th century]]. Musically they usually incorporated "rustic" features in their melody, such as repeated notes. It is clear from the Robert Ballard lute music however that the ''Branle de Village'' was not associated with one specific dance as the structure differs significantly between pieces.
 
There were a number of pieces of music from as early as 1550 called ''Branle de Village'', and they seem to have gained popularity in the early [[17th century]]. Musically they usually incorporated "rustic" features in their melody, such as repeated notes. It is clear from the Robert Ballard lute music however that the ''Branle de Village'' was not associated with one specific dance as the structure differs significantly between pieces.
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===Others===
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Emmanuel Adriaenssen includes a piece called ''Branle Englese'' in his book of [[lute]] music, ''Pratum Musicum''.
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==Branle Suites==
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[[Arbeau]] tells us in his ''[[Orchesography]]'' that there were several well established Branle suites of up to ten dances. These were the ''Branles de Champagne'', the ''Branles de Camp'', the ''Branles de Henault'' and the ''Branles d'Avignon''. He named the suites ''Branles couppez'', which translates literally as ''cut branles'', but is probably more accurately translated as ''mixed branles''.
  
 
{{Branles}}
 
{{Branles}}

Revision as of 23:17, 18 July 2005