Difference between revisions of "Braies"

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Their appearance in mixed company in field workers may indicate that the wearing of ones underwear in public was less of a social faux pas than it is today.
 
Their appearance in mixed company in field workers may indicate that the wearing of ones underwear in public was less of a social faux pas than it is today.
   
==external links==
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==External Links==
 
*http://www.randyasplund.com/browse/medieval/chausse1.html
 
*http://www.randyasplund.com/browse/medieval/chausse1.html
 
*http://www.randyasplund.com/browse/medieval/chauss2.html
 
*http://www.randyasplund.com/browse/medieval/chauss2.html
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*Conjectural Mid-14th Century Braies http://scamelee.freeservers.com/braies_personal.html
 
*Conjectural Mid-14th Century Braies http://scamelee.freeservers.com/braies_personal.html
 
*http://www.bucks-retinue.org.uk/content/view/76/87/
 
*http://www.bucks-retinue.org.uk/content/view/76/87/
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[[category:clothing]]

Revision as of 11:13, 12 May 2006

Braies were mens underwear. They are believed to have been made of linen and are frequently depicted as being white (or off-white) in colour.

Frequently observed in a number of manuscripts where people are farming and wearing split hose which are rolled down.

Earlier braies tend to be baggy and have a rolled waist. Later braies conform to a shape closer to modern, form-fitting boxer shorts. There are also images of smaller bikini-like braies in the 15th century.

Their appearance in mixed company in field workers may indicate that the wearing of ones underwear in public was less of a social faux pas than it is today.

External Links