Difference between revisions of "Baronet"

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(early usage, needs an explanation of "individual summons")
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A '''Baronet''' is ''not'' a [[baron]] or a [[baroness]] or the lands they hold. Instead it is a slightly lower [[England|British]] [[rank]] that lies between baron and [[knight]] on the [[Order of Precedence]]. Only the [[Knights of the Garter]] are above it. It is the lowest [[hereditary]] [[order]].
 
A '''Baronet''' is ''not'' a [[baron]] or a [[baroness]] or the lands they hold. Instead it is a slightly lower [[England|British]] [[rank]] that lies between baron and [[knight]] on the [[Order of Precedence]]. Only the [[Knights of the Garter]] are above it. It is the lowest [[hereditary]] [[order]].
   
It is also just outside of the [[SCA]] [[period]] as it was started by [[James I]] in 1611. However, it was sometimes used to refer to lesser barons (need confirmation!).
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This sense of baronet is also just outside of the [[SCA]] [[period]] as it was started by [[James I]] in 1611. However, the term was also used by [[Richard II]] to refer to [[nobility]] who lost the right of individual summons to [[Parliament]].
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===References===
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* [http://www.debretts.co.uk/peerage_and_baronetage/baronet.html Debretts - Peerage and Baronetage]

Revision as of 12:17, 22 February 2005

A Baronet is not a baron or a baroness or the lands they hold. Instead it is a slightly lower British rank that lies between baron and knight on the Order of Precedence. Only the Knights of the Garter are above it. It is the lowest hereditary order.

This sense of baronet is also just outside of the SCA period as it was started by James I in 1611. However, the term was also used by Richard II to refer to nobility who lost the right of individual summons to Parliament.

References