Difference between revisions of "Autocrat"

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The Autocrat is the person in charge of organising and running an [[event]]. They arrange a [[feastocrat]] if there is to be [[food]] served, a venue, what activities will run, the time activities will run, advertise the event, take bookings, ensure that everyone involved in the event is doing their job, and that everything on the day runs smoothly.
 
The Autocrat is the person in charge of organising and running an [[event]]. They arrange a [[feastocrat]] if there is to be [[food]] served, a venue, what activities will run, the time activities will run, advertise the event, take bookings, ensure that everyone involved in the event is doing their job, and that everything on the day runs smoothly.
   
A Byzantine term that has been turned into a modern SCAism. Event Coordinator. The person in charge of an event. Sometimes called by the more medieval terms "Steward" or "Warden". The suffix "-ocrat" frequently gets tacked onto other types of activity to indicate the person in charge. For examples, "Feastocrat" (q.v.) is the person in charge of a Feast.
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A Byzantine term that has been turned into a modern SCAism. Event Coordinator. The person in charge of an event. Sometimes called by the more medieval terms "Steward" or "Warden". The suffix "-ocrat" frequently gets tacked onto other types of activity to indicate the person in charge. For example, "[[Feastocrat]]" is the person in charge of a [[Feast]].

Revision as of 03:07, 1 July 2003

The Autocrat is the person in charge of organising and running an event. They arrange a feastocrat if there is to be food served, a venue, what activities will run, the time activities will run, advertise the event, take bookings, ensure that everyone involved in the event is doing their job, and that everything on the day runs smoothly.

A Byzantine term that has been turned into a modern SCAism. Event Coordinator. The person in charge of an event. Sometimes called by the more medieval terms "Steward" or "Warden". The suffix "-ocrat" frequently gets tacked onto other types of activity to indicate the person in charge. For example, "Feastocrat" is the person in charge of a Feast.