Difference between revisions of "Arrow"

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It consists of:
 
It consists of:
  
*a head that may be socketed or tanged (the latter particulary prevalent in Viking arrows)
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*a head that may be socketed or tanged (the latter particulary prevalent in [[Viking]] arrows)
  
*a shaft (or stele) that may be parallel, barrelled or tapered
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*a shaft (or stele) that may be parallel, barrelled or tapered and for the most part, made of [[wood]].
  
 
*flights or fletches that are bound along the length of the feathers and before and aft of the same
 
*flights or fletches that are bound along the length of the feathers and before and aft of the same
  
*a nock typically cut into the end of the shaft itself and sometimes set with a horn insert. Some Viking arrows have been found with fitted brass nocks but bare no resemblance to modern plastic nocks.
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*a nock typically cut into the end of the shaft itself and sometimes set with a horn insert. Some Viking arrows have been found with fitted [[bronze]] nocks but bare no resemblance to modern plastic nocks.
  
The heads can be of many different types. They may be barbed for hunting, bodkins for penetrating some forms of armour or broadheads for cutting others.
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The heads can be of many different types. They may be barbed for hunting, bodkins for penetrating some forms of [[armour]] or broadheads for cutting others.
  
 
The flights for the feathers appear in a number of different shapes, none of which are accurately portayed by modern commercially made fletches. Typical shapes include the stereotypical parallel sided fletches (as a child might draw), curved (a long curve that the modern parabolic seems to be based on but has a deeper leading edge), and after the middle of the 13th century, a triangular shape typically seen in the middle ages. There are some variations on this last shape seen.
 
The flights for the feathers appear in a number of different shapes, none of which are accurately portayed by modern commercially made fletches. Typical shapes include the stereotypical parallel sided fletches (as a child might draw), curved (a long curve that the modern parabolic seems to be based on but has a deeper leading edge), and after the middle of the 13th century, a triangular shape typically seen in the middle ages. There are some variations on this last shape seen.

Revision as of 16:08, 3 February 2006