Difference between revisions of "Agape"

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'''Agape''' is one of the three classical "types" of '''love'''; the term is used to refer to the paternal love of God for man, and of man for God, and extends to the brotherly love a man is supposed to feel for all humanity. [The Greek philosophers, it must be noted, rarely took part in crown tournaments or open melees]
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'''Agape''' is one of the three classical "types" of '''love'''; the term is used to refer to the paternal love of [[God]] for man, and of man for God, and extends to the brotherly love a man is supposed to feel for all humanity. (The [[Ancient Greece|Greek]] philosophers, it must be noted, rarely took part in [[crown tournament]]s or open [[melee]]s) Inherent in the concept are two apparently dissonant aspects -- the blind adoration appropriate to man perceiving God (which possibly exceeds the ''eros'' type of love), and the rational appreciation of God's worthiness which would trigger the ''philia'' type.
Inherent in the concept are two, apprently dissonant, aspects -- the blind adoration appropriate to man perceiving God (which possibly exceeds the '''eros''' type of love, and the rational appreciation of God's worthiness which would trigger the '''philia''' type.
 
   
In medieval times a further argument arose, over whether one should love a neighbour who, ostensibly, did not warrant such love. The argument was finally resolved (insofar as philosophical arguments ever are) in favour of non-discrimination, as backed, in the Christian environment then current in Western Europe, by the admionition to "turn the other cheek".
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In [[medieval]] times a further argument arose, over whether one should love a neighbour who ostensibly did not warrant such love. The argument was finally resolved (insofar as philosophical arguments ever are) in favour of non-discrimination, as backed, in the [[Christian]] environment then current in Western [[Europe]], by the admonition to "turn the other cheek".
   
The other "types" of love are [[phila]] and [[eros]]
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The other "types" of love are [[phila]] and [[eros]].
 
[[category:love]]
 
[[category:love]]

Latest revision as of 23:51, 27 June 2010

Agape is one of the three classical "types" of love; the term is used to refer to the paternal love of God for man, and of man for God, and extends to the brotherly love a man is supposed to feel for all humanity. (The Greek philosophers, it must be noted, rarely took part in crown tournaments or open melees) Inherent in the concept are two apparently dissonant aspects -- the blind adoration appropriate to man perceiving God (which possibly exceeds the eros type of love), and the rational appreciation of God's worthiness which would trigger the philia type.

In medieval times a further argument arose, over whether one should love a neighbour who ostensibly did not warrant such love. The argument was finally resolved (insofar as philosophical arguments ever are) in favour of non-discrimination, as backed, in the Christian environment then current in Western Europe, by the admonition to "turn the other cheek".

The other "types" of love are phila and eros.